AISB convention 2017

  In the run up to AISB2017 convention, I've asked Joanna Bryson, from the organising team, to answer few questions about the convention and what comes with it. Mohammad Majid al-Rifaie ( Tu...


Harold Cohen

Harold Cohen, tireless computer art pioneer dies at 87   Harold Cohen at the Tate (1983) Aaron image in background   Harold Cohen died at 87 in his studio on 27th April 2016 in Encintias California, USA.The first time I hear...


Dancing with Pixies?...

At TEDx Tottenham, London Mark Bishop (the former chair of the Society) demonstrates that if the ongoing EU flagship science project - the 1.6 billion dollar "Human Brain Project” - ultimately succeeds in understanding all as...


Computerised Minds. ...

A video sponsored by the society discusses Searle's Chinese Room Argument (CRA) and the heated debates surrounding it. In this video, which is accessible to the general public and those with interest in AI, Olly's Philosophy Tube ...


Connection Science

All individual members of The Society for the Study of Artificial Intelligence and Simulation of Behaviour have a personal subscription to the Taylor Francis journal Connection Science as part of their membership. How to Acce...



AISB miscellaneous Bulletin Item

CFP: Special Issue on "Computational Modeling of Human-Oriented Knowledge within Ambient Intelligence"

Second Call for Papers

(IOS Press)

Thematic Issue on
"Computational Modeling of Human-Oriented Knowledge within AmI"

Recent developments within Ambient Intelligence (AmI) provide new
possibilities to contribute to personal care. For example, our car may
monitor us and warn us when we are falling asleep while driving.
Similarly, the workspace of a technical worker may monitor the person's
stress level, and provide support in case it is too high. As another
example, an elderly person may wear a device that monitors his or her
well-being and generates an action when a dangerous situation is noticed.
While such AmI applications can be initially based on the acquisition and
fusion of sensory information, more intelligent applications need to
depend on the availability of an adequate knowledge base for the analysis
of human functioning. In recent years, scientific areas such as cognitive
science, psychology, neuroscience and biomedical sciences have made
substantial progress in providing increased insight in the physical and
mental aspects of human functioning. Although much work still remains to
be done, models have been developed for a variety of such aspects and the
way in which humans (try to) manage or regulate them. From a biomedical
angle, examples of such aspects are (management of) heart functioning,
diabetes, and eating regulation disorders. From a psychological and social
angle, examples are emotion regulation, attention regulation, addiction
management, trust management, stress management, and criminal behavior
management. If models of human processes and their management are
represented in a formal and computational format, and incorporated in the
human environment, then AmI applications are able to perform a more
in-depth analysis of the human's functioning. This special issue addresses
computational modeling of human-oriented knowledge from disciplines such
as psychology, social science, neuroscience and biomedical sciences, and
the role such models may play for Ambient Intelligence.

See more details at JAISE's webpage: