AISB Convention 2015

Call for Symposium Proposals: The AISB Convention is an annual conference covering the range of AI and Cognitive Science, organised by the Society for the Study of Artificial Intelligence and Simulation of Behaviour. The 2015 Con...


Read More...

Yasemin Erden on BBC

AISB Committee member, and Philosophy Programme Director and Lecturer, Dr Yasemin J. Erden interviewed for the BBC on 29 October 2013. Speaking on the Today programme for BBC Radio 4, as well as the Business Report for BBC world N...


Read More...

Mark Bishop on BBC ...

Mark Bishop, Chair of the Study of Artificial Intelligence and the Simulation of Behaviour, appeared on Newsnight to discuss the ethics of ‘killer robots’. He was approached to give his view on a report raising questions on the et...


Read More...

AISB YouTube Channel

The AISB has launched a YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/AISBTube (http://www.youtube.com/user/AISBTube). The channel currently holds a number of videos from the AISB 2010 Convention. Videos include the AISB round t...


Read More...

Lighthill Debates

The Lighthill debates from 1973 are now available on YouTube. You need to a flashplayer enabled browser to view this YouTube video  


Read More...
01234

Notice

AISB event Bulletin Item

CALL FOR PARTICIPATION: Computational Neurodynamics Seminar "Dynamics of Neuronal Populations in Auditory Cortex", 9th Nov 2011, LONDON


IMPERIAL COLLEGE

Wednesday 9th November - 16:00-17:30 - Room 343, Huxley Building, South Kensington campus, 
Imperial College, London, SW7 2A, UK

Biography: Kenneth Harris is a Professor in the Neurotechnology program, in the departments of 
Bioengineering and Electrical and Electronic Engineering at Imperial College London. He received
a degree in mathematics from Cambridge University and a PhD in robotics from University College 
London, before moving to Rutgers University in the United States for postdoctoral work in 
neuroscience. Before coming to Imperial College in 2009, he was Associate Professor of Neuroscience
at Rutgers. His research focuses on the mechanisms by which populations of cells in the brain 
organize into information-processing assemblies, and the design of artificial computational systems
on similar principles.