AISB convention 2017

  In the run up to AISB2017 convention, I've asked Joanna Bryson, from the organising team, to answer few questions about the convention and what comes with it. Mohammad Majid al-Rifaie (https://twitter.com/mohmaj) Tu...


Read More...

Harold Cohen

Harold Cohen, tireless computer art pioneer dies at 87   Harold Cohen at the Tate (1983) Aaron image in background   Harold Cohen died at 87 in his studio on 27th April 2016 in Encintias California, USA.The first time I hear...


Read More...

Dancing with Pixies?...

At TEDx Tottenham, London Mark Bishop (the former chair of the Society) demonstrates that if the ongoing EU flagship science project - the 1.6 billion dollar "Human Brain Project” - ultimately succeeds in understanding all as...


Read More...

Computerised Minds. ...

A video sponsored by the society discusses Searle's Chinese Room Argument (CRA) and the heated debates surrounding it. In this video, which is accessible to the general public and those with interest in AI, Olly's Philosophy Tube ...


Read More...

Connection Science

All individual members of The Society for the Study of Artificial Intelligence and Simulation of Behaviour have a personal subscription to the Taylor Francis journal Connection Science as part of their membership. How to Acce...


Read More...
01234

Notice

AISB event Bulletin Item

CALL FOR PAPERS: Workshop: Constructing the World, 24-26 May 2013, Cologne, GERMANY


The Emmy Noether research group "Understanding and the A Priori" is hosting an 
author-meets-critics workshop with David Chalmers to critically discuss themes 
from his new book, "Constructing the World" (Oxford University Press 2012). The 
book concerns "scrutability," the thesis that all the truths about the world 
can, in principle, be known on the basis of knowledge of just a limited class 
of basic truths. Chalmers argues for the scrutability thesis and investigates 
which sorts of basic truths can serve as the relevant "scrutability base". The 
book explores the implications of scrutability for a range of central 
philosophical issues: meaning and mental content, the existence of the analytic 
and the a priori, the refutation of skepticism, and the methodology of 
metaphysics, among others.

The workshop will include invited sessions with the following speakers:

Magdalena Balcerak Jackson (Cologne)
Alex Byrne (MIT)
Robin Jeshion (USC)
Hannes Leitgeb (Munich)
David Liebesman (Boston)
Barbara Vetter (HU Berlin)
Mark Wilson (Pittsburgh)

Two sessions for the workshop will be determined on the basis of blind review 
of submissions, and so interested researchers working in all areas of 
philosophy are encouraged to submit abstracts for 45-minute presentations 
devoted to critical discussion of any of the themes of the book. To have a 
presentation considered for the workshop, please submit a 2-page abstract, 
prepared for blind review (i.e. author's name and any identifying information 
removed), along with a separate cover sheet with the title, author's name, 
affiliation and contact information. These should be submitted by email as two 
separate pdf files to: fkreitlo@smail.uni-koeln.de.

The deadline for submissions is March 31, 2012; we aim to make decisions by 
April 15. Questions about the workshop or about submissions can be directed to 
the email address above.