AISB convention 2017

  In the run up to AISB2017 convention, I've asked Joanna Bryson, from the organising team, to answer few questions about the convention and what comes with it. Mohammad Majid al-Rifaie (https://twitter.com/mohmaj) Tu...


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Harold Cohen

Harold Cohen, tireless computer art pioneer dies at 87   Harold Cohen at the Tate (1983) Aaron image in background   Harold Cohen died at 87 in his studio on 27th April 2016 in Encintias California, USA.The first time I hear...


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Dancing with Pixies?...

At TEDx Tottenham, London Mark Bishop (the former chair of the Society) demonstrates that if the ongoing EU flagship science project - the 1.6 billion dollar "Human Brain Project” - ultimately succeeds in understanding all as...


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Computerised Minds. ...

A video sponsored by the society discusses Searle's Chinese Room Argument (CRA) and the heated debates surrounding it. In this video, which is accessible to the general public and those with interest in AI, Olly's Philosophy Tube ...


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Connection Science

All individual members of The Society for the Study of Artificial Intelligence and Simulation of Behaviour have a personal subscription to the Taylor Francis journal Connection Science as part of their membership. How to Acce...


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Notice

AISB opportunities Bulletin Item

DPhil on Insect and Robot Navigation, Sussex, UK

http://www.sussex.ac.uk/lifesci/insectnavigation/
Contact: p.r.graham@sussex.ac.uk OR andrewop@sussex.ac.uk

- BBSRC Funded DPhil on Insect and Robot Navigation at the University of Sussex - 3.5 years of funding (starting Oct 2011) ~13,500 GBP/year

Ants are a well-established model system for studies of the visual control of spatial behaviour. We have a good understanding of the processes by which ants use simple visual information for guidance but there are open questions regarding how insects extract visual information from real-world natural scenes. We believe that a full understanding of how behaviour is produced in the natural world requires on an integrated approach where one seeks to understand the interactions between sensory systems, morphology, behaviour, environment and the brain.

Robotics and computational modelling are excellent tools for studying how these systems are integrated and we are looking for a computationally competent student to undertake a project in this area.
There are many possibilities for this project, and we are open to ideas from candidates, although we would expect most of them would start with building a model of the insect visual system.

This project is a fantastic opportunity for a student in terms of academic career, basic training and opportunity for creative independent research. A successful student would be part of the Centre 
for Computational Neuroscience and Robotics, an interdisciplinary group that provides access to the stimulating research areas of Adaptive Behaviour, Neuroethology and Biological Modelling. Within 
this spirit of inter-disciplinarity, the student would be developing skills in modelling, sensory physiology, computer vision and basic biology.

Applicants should hold or expect to obtain a good Honours degree in computing, biology, physics, mathematics, electronics or a relevant engineering subject.
The eligibility requirements are dictated by the BBSRC. Essentially, applicants must be a UK resident or have lived in the UK for three years (see: the BBSRC website for details, and feel free to 
email us if you have queries.

Please get in touch with Andy or Paul asap if you want more information. Expressions of interest must be received by April 10th.

--
Dr Andrew Philippides
Admissions Tutor/Lecturer
Centre for Computational Neuroscience and Robotics School of Informatics University of Sussex

+44 1273 67 8129

http://www.sussex.ac.uk/lifesci/insectnavigation