Al-Rifaie on BBC

AISB Committee member and Research Fellow at Goldsmiths, University of London, Dr Mohammad Majid al-Rifaie was interviewed by the BBC (in Farsi) along with his colleague Mohammad Ali Javaheri Javid on the 6 November 2014. He was a...


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Rose wins the Loebne...

After 2 hours of judging at Bletchley Park, 'Rose' by Bruce Wilcox was declared the winner of the Loebner Prize 2014, held in conjunction with the AISB.  The event was well attended, film live by Sky News and the special guest jud...


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AISB Convention 2015

The AISB Convention is an annual conference covering the range of AI and Cognitive Science, organised by the Society for the Study of Artificial Intelligence and Simulation of Behaviour. The 2015 Convention will be held at the Uni...


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Yasemin Erden on BBC

AISB Committee member, and Philosophy Programme Director and Lecturer, Dr Yasemin J. Erden interviewed for the BBC on 29 October 2013. Speaking on the Today programme for BBC Radio 4, as well as the Business Report for BBC world N...


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Mark Bishop on BBC ...

Mark Bishop, Chair of the Study of Artificial Intelligence and the Simulation of Behaviour, appeared on Newsnight to discuss the ethics of ‘killer robots’. He was approached to give his view on a report raising questions on the et...


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AISB YouTube Channel

The AISB has launched a YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/AISBTube (http://www.youtube.com/user/AISBTube). The channel currently holds a number of videos from the AISB 2010 Convention. Videos include the AISB round t...


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Notice

AISB opportunities Bulletin Item

The Second Social Learning Strategies Tournament


25,000 prize money

Suppose you find yourself in an unfamiliar environment where you don't know how to get food, 
avoid danger, or travel from A to B. Would you invest time working out what to do on your own, 
or observe other individuals and copy them? Do you copy the first individual you see, or the most
 successful? Or just copy the most common behaviour? 


What would you do?


These questions lie at the centre of a scientific challenge with important implications for the 
evolution of learning and culture: What is the best way to learn in a complex, changing world? 
Following the success of the first Social Learning Strategies Tournament1, we have now received 
funding to run a second tournament that builds on the first by allowing for cumulative culture, 
spatial variation, and model-based learning biases. To enter you need to propose a set of rules 
specifying how and when to learn. All entries will be pitted against each other in computer 
simulations with up to 25,000 in prize money to be won.



Closing date for entries is February 28, 2012 

To find out more: lalandlab.st-andrews.ac.uk

The tournament is organized by Kevin Laland and Luke Rendell (University of St Andrews), and 
overseen by a committee of leading scientists: Robert Boyd (UCLA), Sam Bowles (Santa Fe Institute),
Magnus Enquist (University of Stockholm), Kimmo Eriksson (Mlardalen University), Marcus Feldman 
(Stanford University) and Richard McElreath (UCLA).

1 Rendell et al. (2010) Why copy others? Insights from the Social Learning Strategies Tournament.
Science 328: 208-213