AISB convention 2017

  In the run up to AISB2017 convention, I've asked Joanna Bryson, from the organising team, to answer few questions about the convention and what comes with it. Mohammad Majid al-Rifaie (https://twitter.com/mohmaj) Tu...


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Harold Cohen

Harold Cohen, tireless computer art pioneer dies at 87   Harold Cohen at the Tate (1983) Aaron image in background   Harold Cohen died at 87 in his studio on 27th April 2016 in Encintias California, USA.The first time I hear...


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Dancing with Pixies?...

At TEDx Tottenham, London Mark Bishop (the former chair of the Society) demonstrates that if the ongoing EU flagship science project - the 1.6 billion dollar "Human Brain Project” - ultimately succeeds in understanding all as...


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Computerised Minds. ...

A video sponsored by the society discusses Searle's Chinese Room Argument (CRA) and the heated debates surrounding it. In this video, which is accessible to the general public and those with interest in AI, Olly's Philosophy Tube ...


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Connection Science

All individual members of The Society for the Study of Artificial Intelligence and Simulation of Behaviour have a personal subscription to the Taylor Francis journal Connection Science as part of their membership. How to Acce...


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Notice

AISB miscellaneous Bulletin Item

New Book: NEW COMPUTATIONAL PARADIGMS - CHANGING CONCEPTIONS OF WHAT IS COMPUTABLE


Book Announcement:

____________________________________________________________________________
NEW COMPUTATIONAL PARADIGMS -
CHANGING CONCEPTIONS OF WHAT IS COMPUTABLE

Cooper, S. Barry; Loewe, Benedikt; Sorbi, Andrea (Eds.)
2008, Springer Mathematics of Computing series XIII,
560 pp. 19 illus., Hardcover
ISBN: 978-0-387-36033-1

In recent years, classical computability has expanded beyond its original scope to address issues related to computability and complexity in algebra, analysis, and physics. The deep interconnection between "computation" and "proof" has originated much of the most significant work in constructive mathematics, theoretical computer science and mathematical logic of the last 70 years. Moreover, the increasingly compelling necessity to deal with computability in the real world (such as computing on continuous data, biological computing, and physical models) has brought focus to new paradigms of computation that are based on biological and physical models. These models address questions of efficiency in a radically new way and even threaten to move the so-called Turing barrier, i.e. the line between the decidable and the undecidable.

This book examines new developments in the theory and practice of computation from a mathematical perspective, with topics ranging from classical computability to complexity, from biocomputing to quantum computing. The book opens with an introduction by Andrew Hodges, the Turing biographer, who analyzes the pioneering work that anticipated recent developments concerning computation's allegedly new paradigms. The remaining material covers traditional topics in computability theory such as relative computability, theory of numberings, and domain theory, in addition to topics on the relationships between proof theory, computability, and complexity theory. New paradigms of computation arising from biology and quantum physics are also discussed, as well as the computability of the real numbers and its related issues.